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EMA SEC

Ema Sec is a piece of eARTh. Becoming a mother at a very young age, freeing herself from the heaviness of the society’s expectations and finding inspiration in nature, Ema after giving birth to her two daughters saw that birthing process holds a priceless key to access a portal of intuitive guidance.

Currently living in Mallorca, writing poems filled with breastmilk, soul lessons and healing, making a film about motherhood, aiming for self sufficiency. Ema is trusting the universe’ calling to become a doula and accompany other women on a journey of self discovery and connection to their unique true essence.

On her path nature’s belly has been her home, a place to release old wounds and tear old patterns apart. Plant new seeds and let them flourish. She often turns her head up towards the sky and holds a prayer. In the mother nature’s hands she feels the kingdom of unconditional love unlock softly.

Ema is wearing Dry jumpsuit.

She thrives in company of her daughters and believes she can help their initiation into priestesshood. “The way I choose to parent is unlike any way I have seen before. I trust the instinct of the child to become whoever they need and desire to become. They didn’t come here to feed on blast. They came here to do the immense work previous generations have forgotten to do and that is raising loving vibration of the Earth.” Ema and her husband allow their children to have full freedom in movement, connection to the natural elements and choice about how they spend their time.

“I find fruit growing on trees fascinating. Charged by sister moon and and brother sun, that’s the true gift of life”

That power a woman gains during childbirth will guide them through hardness, through pain towards love and peace. It”s like a fire starter, once lit- burning forever. “Having given birth in my bedroom, has given me a feeling of unstoppable force that no one can take away from me. I don’t think there is a wish I cannot make come true. I just close my eyes make a wish and wait.”

Ema is wearing Drap top and Drap pants.

The reason why I love to be with nature is that she doesn’t impose any classifications on me. My movements have no name. My soul has no age. My emotions fluctuate between the long arms of the palm trees. My body has no destination. My thoughts are unpredictable. She is full of life that chose many forms of sacred geometries. When I interact with her I cannot predict what happens, what animals will cross my sight, what noise I am about to experience, what smell will visit my nose. She doesn’t define my future. In her arms, everything is possible.

Ema is wearing T de Tul and Gatito jacket.
Below Ema is wearing Carne shirt, Cota pants and Naturae sweater.

I

She let her die
On a pillow of round stones
when the sorrow is unknown
In a shade of an wild orchid
When chlorophyll
is not enough
to speed up
The relevance of time
has gotten the face of sugar crystals
She will make the bones dance again
In hermit’s open arms
inhaling the dust
teeth grinning
her cheeks have that wild green flame
Sisters approaching one by one
The gates have never been so widely open
made out of olive wood
luring her into the salty cave
“From now on, you’ll write with your left hand”
both hands grown into left
leaving the asymmetric behind
roaring into silence
I prey to you stones and bones
I will be one of those ghosts
and grow apples of love.

In the next photographies Ema is wearing Dry jacket and Astral skirt.

II

My Earth,
I match my circles to your cycles
Beetroot to blood
Onion to kitchen cries
banana smiles
I harvest the herbs you turn into buqetes
Pending on winter to enter me in summer
Witty games of purple petals
pollen sniffing, the plant seeds and rays of brown grounds wiggle madly
You just want people to hear instead of listen
between the sand and rain
your innocence fluctuates
I free my blood without misery now.
Like the trees let their leaves
when the time comes.
I grow my hair
like you grow your grass
this time it doesn’t have to be cut
making it a special and recovering task
The winds have many faces I can choose from,
what a liberating time for a fly to fly through pupils of zephyr
yet paralyses is an unknown kingdom of western vocabulary.
On my four I go through your seasons,
letting you be one of my lovers
the switch of penetration
from cold to fevers
Famine is lacking in your eyes,
fostering everyone in your stomach,
there is room for all
the empty vessels, the restless beasts or bodyguards of skin.
My abyss palpates the moon
With it’s fingers full of ants
The tradition of dust and fire
is never going to leave.

III

The brides will come around 4 o’clock
Their arms wrapped in marine plants
voices fine as peacock’s plumage
lushes bring me towards dust
I stand there sensing them
My vagina wide awake
what is it all worth?
A short glance at a flower?
Or her smiles that come and go?
Their faces? -on fire
snowing through tunnels
They don’t see nor hear anyone
just the lullabies, made by their lips
The watchers of the time
hiding in the bushes
exploding through the mountains
that grew
between legs
between centuries
between layers of the earth
The brides are mine.
I’ve been catching them since I’ve died.
Their fingers play tunes
on the strings of my insecurity guitar
their tongues grovel towards my sorrows,
their nipples drip on my map of freedom
The brides, covered in silence,
live in and out of me.
they are my scales of life and death.
I promise to feed them,
and keep my vagina wide awake.

BLANCA MUÑOZ

Blanca Muñoz is an artist based in Madrid whose body of work ranges from two-dimensional graphics to iconic, large-scale, metallic sculptures shown in museums such as Reina Sofia, El Prado in Spain and exhibitions all over the world. This autumn she opens up her studio giving us a glimpse into her universe.

“It’s a physically demanding job, but I never overstep my limits and maybe that’s what brings a delicate touch to the work. It’s a highly balanced struggle between the material and my own strength.”

Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

Despite being made from stainless steel her structures possess an ephemeral lightness that is otherworldly. They could be considered magic meteorites of extra-terrestrial antimatter, chunks of stardust fallen from an interstellar landscape, codified messages from another galaxy, maps of parallel planes of existence, or secret celestial bodies of the collective subconscious.

It’s no surprise then that Blanca is part of Madrid’s Astronomical Society, cosmology being a great influence on her work: “I have never ceased learning from trying to visualise how matter behaves in space. My sculptures aim to adapt to unrelenting gravity. At the end of the day, my mind is the only interplanetary traveller.” she confesses.

“Time and space are the two dimensions that give my sculptures movement, as only by walking around them can you experience their form’s kinetic perception. Additionally, I try to shape their volume with transparency by using perforated steel. The various changes in light and colour do the rest.”

Blanca is wearing Mongolia dress.

She plays with light and shadow, suspension and gravity, void and form like two intertwined sides of a moebius strip.

And so space expands, time accelerates, the stars are in constant motion; and Blanca’s work doesn’t stop at sculpture either, moving from the macrocosm to the microcosm with her jewellery: “A monumental work of art must assume certain conditions and responsibilities but at the same time provoke an aesthetic experience. My challenge is to anchor it in space but maintain a sensation of movement, transparency and lightness even if it measures over 7 metres tall. 

A jewel, however, is not a sculpture in miniature. It is a jewel. An object that by necessity must feel nice as it is in contact with the skin and should be designed bearing in mind that is intended for wearing without getting in the way. Each trade has its rules and, though you might be inspired by the same sources and even mix them, you have to be faithful to the method to fulfil its different purposes.”

Above Blanca is wearing Poncho, Drap jacket, Campo top and Drap pants.
Left Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

For Blanca beauty lies in “all that captures your aesthetic attention and presents itself as the best option for its existence.” She manipulates metal with her very own hands and mind: “I make a mental effort to always surround myself with whatever gives me energy and pleasure. Perhaps maintaining this attitude as I attempt to master the steel gives the shapes a certain sensuality…” 

Her female references range from Barbara Hepworth to Seraphine, Clara Peeters or Sofonisba Anguissola but her original idol is her mother, a self-taught artist and nature lover: “At the beginning of my career I was trapped, trying to imitate how nature, on any of its multiple scales, develops and expands in space. This led me to gradually observe nature more and more from the inside. Now I feel as though I am a part of nature so I let myself get carried away by its internal pulse. I think that one of the advantages of getting older, and therefor gaining experience, is that you become at peace with the sole idea of getting it wrong as you see yourself growing ever smaller in the vastness.”

Above Blanca is wearing Drap jacket and Drap pants.

ALICE JAY

Alice Jay is an activist and Campaign Director for AVAAZ, the online global community for change. From a young age she wanted to understand the world and it’s injustices. As soon as she finished university she travelled to Guatemala to document attacks on indigenous tribes and from there began a fifteen-year journey whicht took her from  South Africa to Laos, Sierra Leone to Colombia, and Uganda to Palestine: “Everywhere I went, in the midst of suffering and war, I found people with huge hearts, and a fearless determined spirit to overcome. They inspired me to be an activist.” 

Alice is wearing Corsica long blue dress from our SS19 Collection

“I have the privilege of working with people from every walk of life. I love learning from their stories and together trying to weave a better world based on the idea that we are all interdependent, and we have much more in common than that which divides us.”

Alice is wearing Kuala Dress and Lumpur Pants.

Perhaps one of those things we have in common is, as Alice assures us, the most urgent cause right now: the existential threat to life on earth.

“We are facing the sixth extinction because we humans have taken a chainsaw to the tree of life - we've annihilated species and ecosystems, and polluted ourselves into a climate crisis. Unless we act now we may become the first species to document our own extinction! But there are clear pathways out to save ourselves and our beautiful planet, and I have hope with the young people rising up to demand urgent action that we may still turn this around.”

Naturally, as an environmentalist she is a keen nature-lover: “I am in awe of nature’s complexity, resilience and beauty. I am happiest on a warm rock by the sea in Mallorca, or on a windy cliff in Ireland. And whilst I think most people can close their eyes and think of a place in nature that they love, few know that if we keep destroying our home, we will not survive. I truly believe in the indigenous reverence of nature as mother, as guide, and as the source of all we are and all we need.”

Alice is wearing Solar coat and pants.

Working to improve women’s rights all over the world, Alice finds inspiration in their grace, their authenticity, their strong spirits, their child birthing power, and their empathetic and courageous hearts: “I see queens and goddesses everywhere - the glowing pregnant mothers; the lined, grey-haired grandmothers; the sensual and powerful youth; the pixie-like, dreaming girls... to me they are all feminine beauty.”

SARAH KINDER

Sarah Kinder is a London-based artist channeling a more conceptual and creative approach to styling by blurring the boundaries between mediums such as photography, film and painting, producing large-scale painting installations through the use of digital media.

“I believe that as a contemporary creative it is important that my work reflects issues and current affairs, responding to the world we exist in. My current focus ‘Project Projection’ looks at a fresh approach to styling as a direct response to the fast-paced fashion industry and our increasing consumption of digital content. The work projects cutouts of garments taken from runway shows onto the body, allowing the clothes to go straight from show to model.”

Coming from a Fine Arts background, her work at the Royal Academy of Arts in London has influenced her creatively and informed her practice. Here she met, and subsequently became muse and model to, both painter Ken Howard and her partner and collaborator Michael Brunn, whose drawings of her we see pictured in this series.

“I enjoy the act of collaboration; it’s important to trust creative relationships which can birth many ideas.”

She says that not having come from a traditional fashion background and being somewhat naïve to the fashion industry has actually been a blessing, giving her more creative freedom.

ARTWORK BY MICHAEL BRUNN

“My style values are about being selective, trusting my own vision and although nothing is really original anymore, everyone has their own language to express it in.

For Sarah, beauty is about vulnerability, rawness and empowerment. “When you work with nudity in a project, it often brings a vulnerability and realness to the work - It creates a trusting and more intimate relationship with your subject, which captures a powerful yet delicate and sensitive image.”

She uses clothing like a second layer of skin, as a form of expression to enhance the natural, raw beauty of the body.  

“I see the body as an art form, a human canvas - we exist as our own greatest work of art; physically, emotionally, mentally working on ourselves from the moment we start to explore and find our place in this world.”

“I am curious as to how being a first time mother will affect my work, and whether my new perspectives as a parent will change the way I choose to show the human form, and how the issues reflected within my work will change as my priorities shift. I’ve learnt the importance of trying to stay in the present moment and not think too much about the future. Life is about balance.”

ANOUSKA BECKWITH

Anouska Beckwith is an English fine art photographer living in Paris and founder of the all-female artists’ collective World Wide Women.
For Anouska, feminine beauty is to be natural and at ease with yourself:
“I feel that beauty shines from within. We all have a light, an essence inside of ourselves and when we are our most happy its vibrancy shines through us like a beacon. When I capture an image my goal is to capture that essence.  That is what makes a photograph truly come alive.”

Anouska wears our Siam dress from the Spring Summer 2019 Collection.

She confesses she suffers from the “Golden Age Syndrome” and often feels she was
meant to be born in another time, her work echoing the pre-Raphaelites, or the
bohemian 60’s and 70’s. “The time periods I draw upon are ones that I either wish I had
lived in or have some affinity to. That is not to say I cannot create a fantasy all of my
very own.”

Anouska wears the Cairo Dress and Byblos coat from the Spring Summer 2019 Collection.

Anouska almost always shoots outdoors: “Nature is my religion and the earth is my church. I am completely in love with Mother Earth and all her incredible gifts she bestows upon us. She is mighty and powerful and soft and tender at the same time, a complete paradox in so many ways, but if you listen to her she can hold you and heal your spirit when it is lonely and offer you paradise in return.”

Anouska wears our Alysa strawberry pink dress from the Spring Summer 2019 Collection.

“Springtime is my favourite season, I adore the newly sprung buds of blossom and the unfurling green leaves after such a dormant introspective period. I always feel so hopeful and positive about the year at this time.”
However, she reminds us we need both light and dark to experience life fully and to embrace both sides of our nature; and is learning to take on the darker aspects of life as her greatest teachers, alongside her new role of mother with the birth of the light of her life, her daughter Luna.

CLAIRE O'KEEFE

Visual artist and a declared hedonist, Claire O'Keefe (Mallorca, 1984) defines herself as an unconditional disciple of Nature.

Claire wears Cairo dress and Byblos coat.

Her creative impulse is transformed into a language of her own, one in which there is impermanence, an acceptance of the imperfect, and a place for unexpected errors.   
Through photography, artistic direction or design Claire O’Keefe develops her own femininity to deepen her emotional and artistic self-knowledge.  

Claire wears Corsica top and pants.

Claire wears Corfu top and skirt. 

Claire wears the Delhi jumpsuit.

“Every woman that has inspired me on my journey is part of what I am today, and when I look in the mirror, I see them all. For me, it's crucial to be a part of projects that trust my vision and my feminine instinct. Only believing in my own sensitivity I can get involved on different levels, working on the concept, the soul and aesthetics of each project."

 

Claire wears Sacco top & pants. 

MARIA SOLIVELLAS

Originally from a theatre background, Maria went back to her roots in Mallorca to set up the restaurant Ca na Toneta.

“I try and explain my landscape, who we are, where we come from and where we are headed through taste. As a chef I feel I am interpreting the region I live in”.

Self-taught, and nourished from her mother’s cooking, Maria has come up with her own food philosophy and is a self-confessed “fierce advocate for local, organic, and seasonal produce”. For her it is essential to work with your environment, to connect with local farmers and producers in Mallorca and to use local varieties.

Maria wears the Beeswax Coat and Headscarf and above the Kassar striped coat and pants.

Simplicity and balance are the two most important ingredients in her cooking: “It’s more complex that you think because you have to step back from your ego, allow the product to express itself and not overly interfere with something that already has its own expression, which is taste.”

 

For Maria, simplicity is an inspiring exercise that can be applied to any discipline, going beyond the surface and turning complexity around.

For her, the seasons are a manifestation of the now, the precise moment we live in: “ It’s an absolute reality. When we talk about seasonal produce, we’re talking about a product that’s at the best moment the earth can yield; it’s optimum point of maturity, that it’s not been forced to grow. It’s common sense”.

Maria wears the Asia shirt and the Lavender Pants.

Ca na Toneta, located at the foot of the Serra de Tramuntana, is deeply connected with the mountains and the forest, which is at its most opulent in autumn when walks through the woods are an absolute delight.

Maria admits she must have been a great harvester-gatherer in another life. That is why she devotes a lot of time to gathering wild produce and seeking out local suppliers, which in the end, is also another form of harvesting. 

ANNA BONNY

Noelia is the creator of Anna Bonny, a project that aims to help evolve how society perceives Breast Cancer, femininity and beauty.

Lavender jacket and pants with underneath the Studio 54 patch by Anna Bonny. 

Noelia kind of finds herself to be a pirate, she didn't seek out the role but whilst recovering from a radical mastectomy in 2015, and gazing at herself in the mirror, the way she saw herself changed. Noelia chose not to reconstruct and so was left with the dilemma of how to feel good with only one breast, a hard question but yet with a simple solution; she became a pirate. 

She slashed a beautiful bra in half and slung the remains across her scar like an eye patch. It was a startling moment, she felt liberated, and also her partner was suddenly seduced.

Noelia wears Kid jacket and skirt from the Cortana Fall Winter collection. 

Born out of personal necessity the mastectomy patch was born, a simple garment which aims to help mastectomized women come to peace with their new body image, gain confidence and normalize living with one breast. The patch is an adornment, a celebration of acceptance, a new option post-mastectomy.

Below: Noelia wears Irony blouse, Moro pants, and Beeswax headscarf.  

ALEXIA SINNOBLE

Alexia Sinoble, painter, student of the classics, fencing apprentice, chronicler, translator... dilettante.  

Alexia wears Army Jumpsuit and Cisne Tulle

I know and I have for me
that I am delightedand this is enough for the safety of my conscience. (The Quixote II, XLIX)

MAR AGUILÓ

 

Mar Aguiló, a dancer at the Compañía Nacional de Danza photographed in Mallorca, her birthplace. For Mar, dance way to return to the earth, to feel the tradition and the deep palpitation of the body attached to nature.

Water hollows stone,
wind scatters water,
stone stops the wind.
Water, wind, stone.
Wind carves stone,
stone's a cup of water,
water escapes and is wind.
Stone, wind, water.
Wind sings in its whirling,
water murmurs going by, unmoving stone keeps still.
Wind, water, stone.
Each is another and no other:
crossing and vanishing
through their empty names:
water, stone, wind.
 

Octavio Paz

EMA SEC

Ema Sec is a piece of eARTh. Becoming a mother at a very young age, freeing herself from the heaviness of the society’s expectations and finding inspiration in nature, Ema after giving birth to her two daughters saw that birthing process holds a priceless key to access a portal of intuitive guidance.

Currently living in Mallorca, writing poems filled with breastmilk, soul lessons and healing, making a film about motherhood, aiming for self sufficiency. Ema is trusting the universe’ calling to become a doula and accompany other women on a journey of self discovery and connection to their unique true essence.

On her path nature’s belly has been her home, a place to release old wounds and tear old patterns apart. Plant new seeds and let them flourish. She often turns her head up towards the sky and holds a prayer. In the mother nature’s hands she feels the kingdom of unconditional love unlock softly.

Ema is wearing Dry jumpsuit.

She thrives in company of her daughters and believes she can help their initiation into priestesshood. “The way I choose to parent is unlike any way I have seen before. I trust the instinct of the child to become whoever they need and desire to become. They didn’t come here to feed on blast. They came here to do the immense work previous generations have forgotten to do and that is raising loving vibration of the Earth.” Ema and her husband allow their children to have full freedom in movement, connection to the natural elements and choice about how they spend their time.

“I find fruit growing on trees fascinating. Charged by sister moon and and brother sun, that’s the true gift of life”

That power a woman gains during childbirth will guide them through hardness, through pain towards love and peace. It”s like a fire starter, once lit- burning forever. “Having given birth in my bedroom, has given me a feeling of unstoppable force that no one can take away from me. I don’t think there is a wish I cannot make come true. I just close my eyes make a wish and wait.”

Ema is wearing Drap top and Drap pants.

The reason why I love to be with nature is that she doesn’t impose any classifications on me. My movements have no name. My soul has no age. My emotions fluctuate between the long arms of the palm trees. My body has no destination. My thoughts are unpredictable. She is full of life that chose many forms of sacred geometries. When I interact with her I cannot predict what happens, what animals will cross my sight, what noise I am about to experience, what smell will visit my nose. She doesn’t define my future. In her arms, everything is possible.

Above Ema is wearing T de Tul and Gatito jacket.
Below Ema is wearing Carne shirtCota pants and Naturae sweater.

I

She let her die
On a pillow of round stones
when the sorrow is unknown
In a shade of an wild orchid
When chlorophyll
is not enough
to speed up
The relevance of time
has gotten the face of sugar crystals
She will make the bones dance again
In hermit’s open arms
inhaling the dust
teeth grinning
her cheeks have that wild green flame
Sisters approaching one by one
The gates have never been so widely open
made out of olive wood
luring her into the salty cave
“From now on, you’ll write with your left hand”
both hands grown into left
leaving the asymmetric behind
roaring into silence
I prey to you stones and bones
I will be one of those ghosts
and grow apples of love.

In the next photographies Ema is wearing Dry jacket and Astral skirt.

II

My Earth,
I match my circles to your cycles
Beetroot to blood
Onion to kitchen cries
banana smiles
I harvest the herbs you turn into buqetes
Pending on winter to enter me in summer
Witty games of purple petals
pollen sniffing, the plant seeds and rays of brown grounds wiggle madly
You just want people to hear instead of listen
between the sand and rain
your innocence fluctuates
I free my blood without misery now.
Like the trees let their leaves
when the time comes.
I grow my hair
like you grow your grass
this time it doesn’t have to be cut
making it a special and recovering task
The winds have many faces I can choose from,
what a liberating time for a fly to fly through pupils of zephyr
yet paralyses is an unknown kingdom of western vocabulary.
On my four I go through your seasons,
letting you be one of my lovers
the switch of penetration
from cold to fevers
Famine is lacking in your eyes,
fostering everyone in your stomach,
there is room for all
the empty vessels, the restless beasts or bodyguards of skin.
My abyss palpates the moon
With it’s fingers full of ants
The tradition of dust and fire
is never going to leave.

III

The brides will come around 4 o’clock
Their arms wrapped in marine plants
voices fine as peacock’s plumage
lushes bring me towards dust
I stand there sensing them
My vagina wide awake
what is it all worth?
A short glance at a flower?
Or her smiles that come and go?
Their faces? -on fire
snowing through tunnels
They don’t see nor hear anyone
just the lullabies, made by their lips
The watchers of the time
hiding in the bushes
exploding through the mountains
that grew
between legs
between centuries
between layers of the earth
The brides are mine.
I’ve been catching them since I’ve died.
Their fingers play tunes
on the strings of my insecurity guitar
their tongues grovel towards my sorrows,
their nipples drip on my map of freedom
The brides, covered in silence,
live in and out of me.
they are my scales of life and death.
I promise to feed them,
and keep my vagina wide awake.

BLANCA MUÑOZ

Blanca Muñoz is an artist based in Madrid whose body of work ranges from two-dimensional graphics to iconic, large-scale, metallic sculptures shown in museums such as Reina Sofia, El Prado in Spain and exhibitions all over the world. This autumn she opens up her studio giving us a glimpse into her universe.

“It’s a physically demanding job, but I never overstep my limits and maybe that’s what brings a delicate touch to the work. It’s a highly balanced struggle between the material and my own strength.”

Above Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

Despite being made from stainless steel her structures possess an ephemeral lightness that is otherworldly. They could be considered magic meteorites of extra-terrestrial antimatter, chunks of stardust fallen from an interstellar landscape, codified messages from another galaxy, maps of parallel planes of existence, or secret celestial bodies of the collective subconscious.

It’s no surprise then that Blanca is part of Madrid’s Astronomical Society, cosmology being a great influence on her work: “I have never ceased learning from trying to visualise how matter behaves in space. My sculptures aim to adapt to unrelenting gravity. At the end of the day, my mind is the only interplanetary traveller.” she confesses.

“Time and space are the two dimensions that give my sculptures movement, as only by walking around them can you experience their form’s kinetic perception. Additionally, I try to shape their volume with transparency by using perforated steel. The various changes in light and colour do the rest.”

Above and the following image Blanca is wearing Mongolia dress.

She plays with light and shadow, suspension and gravity, void and form like two intertwined sides of a moebius strip.

And so space expands, time accelerates, the stars are in constant motion; and Blanca’s work doesn’t stop at sculpture either, moving from the macrocosm to the microcosm with her jewellery: “A monumental work of art must assume certain conditions and responsibilities but at the same time provoke an aesthetic experience. My challenge is to anchor it in space but maintain a sensation of movement, transparency and lightness even if it measures over 7 metres tall. 

A jewel, however, is not a sculpture in miniature. It is a jewel. An object that by necessity must feel nice as it is in contact with the skin and should be designed bearing in mind that is intended for wearing without getting in the way. Each trade has its rules and, though you might be inspired by the same sources and even mix them, you have to be faithful to the method to fulfil its different purposes.”

Above Blanca is wearing Poncho, Drap jacket, Campo top and Drap pants.
Below Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

For Blanca beauty lies in “all that captures your aesthetic attention and presents itself as the best option for its existence.” She manipulates metal with her very own hands and mind: “I make a mental effort to always surround myself with whatever gives me energy and pleasure. Perhaps maintaining this attitude as I attempt to master the steel gives the shapes a certain sensuality…” 

Her female references range from Barbara Hepworth to Seraphine, Clara Peeters or Sofonisba Anguissola but her original idol is her mother, a self-taught artist and nature lover: “At the beginning of my career I was trapped, trying to imitate how nature, on any of its multiple scales, develops and expands in space. This led me to gradually observe nature more and more from the inside. Now I feel as though I am a part of nature so I let myself get carried away by its internal pulse. I think that one of the advantages of getting older, and therefor gaining experience, is that you become at peace with the sole idea of getting it wrong as you see yourself growing ever smaller in the vastness.”

Above Blanca is wearing Drap jacket and Drap pants.

ALICE JAY

Alice Jay is an activist and Campaign Director for AVAAZ, the online global community for change. From a young age she wanted to understand the world and it’s injustices. As soon as she finished university she travelled to Guatemala to document attacks on indigenous tribes and from there began a fifteen-year journey whicht took her from  South Africa to Laos, Sierra Leone to Colombia, and Uganda to Palestine: “Everywhere I went, in the midst of suffering and war, I found people with huge hearts, and a fearless determined spirit to overcome. They inspired me to be an activist.” 

Alice is wearing Corsica long blue dress from our SS19 Collection

“I have the privilege of working with people from every walk of life. I love learning from their stories and together trying to weave a better world based on the idea that we are all interdependent, and we have much more in common than that which divides us.”

Alice is wearing Kuala Dress and Lumpur Pants.

Perhaps one of those things we have in common is, as Alice assures us, the most urgent cause right now: the existential threat to life on earth.

“We are facing the sixth extinction because we humans have taken a chainsaw to the tree of life - we've annihilated species and ecosystems, and polluted ourselves into a climate crisis. Unless we act now we may become the first species to document our own extinction! But there are clear pathways out to save ourselves and our beautiful planet, and I have hope with the young people rising up to demand urgent action that we may still turn this around.”

Naturally, as an environmentalist she is a keen nature-lover: “I am in awe of nature’s complexity, resilience and beauty. I am happiest on a warm rock by the sea in Mallorca, or on a windy cliff in Ireland. And whilst I think most people can close their eyes and think of a place in nature that they love, few know that if we keep destroying our home, we will not survive. I truly believe in the indigenous reverence of nature as mother, as guide, and as the source of all we are and all we need.”

Alice is wearing Solar coat and pants.

Working to improve women’s rights all over the world, Alice finds inspiration in their grace, their authenticity, their strong spirits, their child birthing power, and their empathetic and courageous hearts: “I see queens and goddesses everywhere - the glowing pregnant mothers; the lined, grey-haired grandmothers; the sensual and powerful youth; the pixie-like, dreaming girls... to me they are all feminine beauty.”

SARAH KINDER

Sarah Kinder is a London-based artist channeling a more conceptual and creative approach to styling by blurring the boundaries between mediums such as photography, film and painting, producing large-scale painting installations through the use of digital media.

“I believe that as a contemporary creative it is important that my work reflects issues and current affairs, responding to the world we exist in. My current focus ‘Project Projection’ looks at a fresh approach to styling as a direct response to the fast-paced fashion industry and our increasing consumption of digital content. The work projects cutouts of garments taken from runway shows onto the body, allowing the clothes to go straight from show to model.”

Coming from a Fine Arts background, her work at the Royal Academy of Arts in London has influenced her creatively and informed her practice. Here she met, and subsequently became muse and model to, both painter Ken Howard and her partner and collaborator Michael Brunn, whose drawings of her we see pictured in this series.

“I enjoy the act of collaboration; it’s important to trust creative relationships which can birth many ideas.”

She says that not having come from a traditional fashion background and being somewhat naïve to the fashion industry has actually been a blessing, giving her more creative freedom.

ARTWORK BY MICHAEL BRUNN

“My style values are about being selective, trusting my own vision and although nothing is really original anymore, everyone has their own language to express it in.

For Sarah, beauty is about vulnerability, rawness and empowerment. “When you work with nudity in a project, it often brings a vulnerability and realness to the work - It creates a trusting and more intimate relationship with your subject, which captures a powerful yet delicate and sensitive image.”

She uses clothing like a second layer of skin, as a form of expression to enhance the natural, raw beauty of the body.  

“I see the body as an art form, a human canvas - we exist as our own greatest work of art; physically, emotionally, mentally working on ourselves from the moment we start to explore and find our place in this world.”

“I am curious as to how being a first time mother will affect my work, and whether my new perspectives as a parent will change the way I choose to show the human form, and how the issues reflected within my work will change as my priorities shift. I’ve learnt the importance of trying to stay in the present moment and not think too much about the future. Life is about balance.”

ANOUSKA BECKWITH

Anouska Beckwith is an English fine art photographer living in Paris and founder of the all-female artists’ collective World Wide Women.
For Anouska, feminine beauty is to be natural and at ease with yourself:
“I feel that beauty shines from within. We all have a light, an essence inside of ourselves and when we are our most happy its vibrancy shines through us like a beacon. When I capture an image my goal is to capture that essence.  That is what makes a photograph truly come alive.”

Anouska wears our Siam dress from the Spring Summer 2019 Collection.

She confesses she suffers from the “Golden Age Syndrome” and often feels she was
meant to be born in another time, her work echoing the pre-Raphaelites, or the
bohemian 60’s and 70’s. “The time periods I draw upon are ones that I either wish I had
lived in or have some affinity to. That is not to say I cannot create a fantasy all of my
very own.”

Anouska wears the Cairo Dress and Byblos coat from the Spring Summer 2019 Collection.

Anouska almost always shoots outdoors: “Nature is my religion and the earth is my church. I am completely in love with Mother Earth and all her incredible gifts she bestows upon us. She is mighty and powerful and soft and tender at the same time, a complete paradox in so many ways, but if you listen to her she can hold you and heal your spirit when it is lonely and offer you paradise in return.”

Anouska wears our Alysa strawberry pink dress from the Spring Summer 2019 Collection.

“Springtime is my favourite season, I adore the newly sprung buds of blossom and the unfurling green leaves after such a dormant introspective period. I always feel so hopeful and positive about the year at this time.”
However, she reminds us we need both light and dark to experience life fully and to embrace both sides of our nature; and is learning to take on the darker aspects of life as her greatest teachers, alongside her new role of mother with the birth of the light of her life, her daughter Luna.

CLAIRE O'KEEFE

Visual artist and a declared hedonist, Claire O'Keefe (Mallorca, 1984) defines herself as an unconditional disciple of Nature.

Claire wears Cairo dress and Byblos coat.

Her creative impulse is transformed into a language of her own, one in which there is impermanence, an acceptance of the imperfect, and a place for unexpected errors.   
Through photography, artistic direction or design Claire O’Keefe develops her own femininity to deepen her emotional and artistic self-knowledge.  

Claire wears Corsica top and pants.

Claire wears Corfu top and skirt. 

Claire wears the Delhi jumpsuit.

“Every woman that has inspired me on my journey is part of what I am today, and when I look in the mirror, I see them all. For me, it's crucial to be a part of projects that trust my vision and my feminine instinct. Only believing in my own sensitivity I can get involved on different levels, working on the concept, the soul and aesthetics of each project."

 

Claire wears Sacco top & pants. 

MARIA SOLIVELLAS

Originally from a theatre background, Maria went back to her roots in Mallorca to set up the restaurant Ca na Toneta.

“I try and explain my landscape, who we are, where we come from and where we are headed through taste. As a chef I feel I am interpreting the region I live in”.

Self-taught, and nourished from her mother’s cooking, Maria has come up with her own food philosophy and is a self-confessed “fierce advocate for local, organic, and seasonal produce”. For her it is essential to work with your environment, to connect with local farmers and producers in Mallorca and to use local varieties.

Maria wears the Beeswax Coat and Headscarf and above the Kassar striped coat and pants.

Simplicity and balance are the two most important ingredients in her cooking: “It’s more complex that you think because you have to step back from your ego, allow the product to express itself and not overly interfere with something that already has its own expression, which is taste.”

 

For Maria, simplicity is an inspiring exercise that can be applied to any discipline, going beyond the surface and turning complexity around.

For her, the seasons are a manifestation of the now, the precise moment we live in: “ It’s an absolute reality. When we talk about seasonal produce, we’re talking about a product that’s at the best moment the earth can yield; it’s optimum point of maturity, that it’s not been forced to grow. It’s common sense”.

Maria wears the Asia shirt and the Lavender Pants.

Ca na Toneta, located at the foot of the Serra de Tramuntana, is deeply connected with the mountains and the forest, which is at its most opulent in autumn when walks through the woods are an absolute delight.

Maria admits she must have been a great harvester-gatherer in another life. That is why she devotes a lot of time to gathering wild produce and seeking out local suppliers, which in the end, is also another form of harvesting. 

ANNA BONNY

Noelia is the creator of Anna Bonny, a project that aims to help evolve how society perceives Breast Cancer, femininity and beauty.

Lavender jacket and pants with underneath the Studio 54 patch by Anna Bonny. 

Noelia kind of finds herself to be a pirate, she didn't seek out the role but whilst recovering from a radical mastectomy in 2015, and gazing at herself in the mirror, the way she saw herself changed. Noelia chose not to reconstruct and so was left with the dilemma of how to feel good with only one breast, a hard question but yet with a simple solution; she became a pirate. 

She slashed a beautiful bra in half and slung the remains across her scar like an eye patch. It was a startling moment, she felt liberated, and also her partner was suddenly seduced.

Noelia wears Kid jacket and skirt from the Cortana Fall Winter collection. 

Born out of personal necessity the mastectomy patch was born, a simple garment which aims to help mastectomized women come to peace with their new body image, gain confidence and normalize living with one breast. The patch is an adornment, a celebration of acceptance, a new option post-mastectomy.

Below: Noelia wears Irony blouse, Moro pants, and Beeswax headscarf.  

ALEXIA SINNOBLE

Alexia Sinoble, painter, student of the classics, fencing apprentice, chronicler, translator... dilettante.  

Alexia wears Army Jumpsuit and Cisne Tulle

I know and I have for me
that I am delightedand this is enough for the safety of my conscience. (The Quixote II, XLIX)

MAR AGUILÓ

 

Mar Aguiló, a dancer at the Compañía Nacional de Danza photographed in Mallorca, her birthplace. For Mar, dance way to return to the earth, to feel the tradition and the deep palpitation of the body attached to nature.

Water hollows stone,
wind scatters water,
stone stops the wind.
Water, wind, stone.
Wind carves stone,
stone's a cup of water,
water escapes and is wind.
Stone, wind, water.
Wind sings in its whirling,
water murmurs going by, unmoving stone keeps still.
Wind, water, stone.
Each is another and no other:
crossing and vanishing
through their empty names:
water, stone, wind.
 

Octavio Paz