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BLANCA MUÑOZ

Blanca Muñoz is an artist based in Madrid whose body of work ranges from two-dimensional graphics to iconic, large-scale, metallic sculptures shown in museums such as Reina Sofia, El Prado in Spain and exhibitions all over the world. This autumn she opens up her studio giving us a glimpse into her universe.

“It’s a physically demanding job, but I never overstep my limits and maybe that’s what brings a delicate touch to the work. It’s a highly balanced struggle between the material and my own strength.”

Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

Despite being made from stainless steel her structures possess an ephemeral lightness that is otherworldly. They could be considered magic meteorites of extra-terrestrial antimatter, chunks of stardust fallen from an interstellar landscape, codified messages from another galaxy, maps of parallel planes of existence, or secret celestial bodies of the collective subconscious.

It’s no surprise then that Blanca is part of Madrid’s Astronomical Society, cosmology being a great influence on her work: “I have never ceased learning from trying to visualise how matter behaves in space. My sculptures aim to adapt to unrelenting gravity. At the end of the day, my mind is the only interplanetary traveller.” she confesses.

“Time and space are the two dimensions that give my sculptures movement, as only by walking around them can you experience their form’s kinetic perception. Additionally, I try to shape their volume with transparency by using perforated steel. The various changes in light and colour do the rest.”

Blanca is wearing Mongolia dress.

She plays with light and shadow, suspension and gravity, void and form like two intertwined sides of a moebius strip.

And so space expands, time accelerates, the stars are in constant motion; and Blanca’s work doesn’t stop at sculpture either, moving from the macrocosm to the microcosm with her jewellery: “A monumental work of art must assume certain conditions and responsibilities but at the same time provoke an aesthetic experience. My challenge is to anchor it in space but maintain a sensation of movement, transparency and lightness even if it measures over 7 metres tall. 

A jewel, however, is not a sculpture in miniature. It is a jewel. An object that by necessity must feel nice as it is in contact with the skin and should be designed bearing in mind that is intended for wearing without getting in the way. Each trade has its rules and, though you might be inspired by the same sources and even mix them, you have to be faithful to the method to fulfil its different purposes.”

Above Blanca is wearing Poncho, Drap jacket, Campo top and Drap pants.
Left Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

For Blanca beauty lies in “all that captures your aesthetic attention and presents itself as the best option for its existence.” She manipulates metal with her very own hands and mind: “I make a mental effort to always surround myself with whatever gives me energy and pleasure. Perhaps maintaining this attitude as I attempt to master the steel gives the shapes a certain sensuality…” 

Her female references range from Barbara Hepworth to Seraphine, Clara Peeters or Sofonisba Anguissola but her original idol is her mother, a self-taught artist and nature lover: “At the beginning of my career I was trapped, trying to imitate how nature, on any of its multiple scales, develops and expands in space. This led me to gradually observe nature more and more from the inside. Now I feel as though I am a part of nature so I let myself get carried away by its internal pulse. I think that one of the advantages of getting older, and therefor gaining experience, is that you become at peace with the sole idea of getting it wrong as you see yourself growing ever smaller in the vastness.”

Above Blanca is wearing Drap jacket and Drap pants.

Photographed by Claire O'keefe

BLANCA MUÑOZ

Blanca Muñoz is an artist based in Madrid whose body of work ranges from two-dimensional graphics to iconic, large-scale, metallic sculptures shown in museums such as Reina Sofia, El Prado in Spain and exhibitions all over the world. This autumn she opens up her studio giving us a glimpse into her universe.

“It’s a physically demanding job, but I never overstep my limits and maybe that’s what brings a delicate touch to the work. It’s a highly balanced struggle between the material and my own strength.”

Above Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

Despite being made from stainless steel her structures possess an ephemeral lightness that is otherworldly. They could be considered magic meteorites of extra-terrestrial antimatter, chunks of stardust fallen from an interstellar landscape, codified messages from another galaxy, maps of parallel planes of existence, or secret celestial bodies of the collective subconscious.

It’s no surprise then that Blanca is part of Madrid’s Astronomical Society, cosmology being a great influence on her work: “I have never ceased learning from trying to visualise how matter behaves in space. My sculptures aim to adapt to unrelenting gravity. At the end of the day, my mind is the only interplanetary traveller.” she confesses.

“Time and space are the two dimensions that give my sculptures movement, as only by walking around them can you experience their form’s kinetic perception. Additionally, I try to shape their volume with transparency by using perforated steel. The various changes in light and colour do the rest.”

Above and the following image Blanca is wearing Mongolia dress.

She plays with light and shadow, suspension and gravity, void and form like two intertwined sides of a moebius strip.

And so space expands, time accelerates, the stars are in constant motion; and Blanca’s work doesn’t stop at sculpture either, moving from the macrocosm to the microcosm with her jewellery: “A monumental work of art must assume certain conditions and responsibilities but at the same time provoke an aesthetic experience. My challenge is to anchor it in space but maintain a sensation of movement, transparency and lightness even if it measures over 7 metres tall. 

A jewel, however, is not a sculpture in miniature. It is a jewel. An object that by necessity must feel nice as it is in contact with the skin and should be designed bearing in mind that is intended for wearing without getting in the way. Each trade has its rules and, though you might be inspired by the same sources and even mix them, you have to be faithful to the method to fulfil its different purposes.”

Above Blanca is wearing Poncho, Drap jacket, Campo top and Drap pants.
Below Blanca is wearing Poncho, Ava pants and Mecca top.

For Blanca beauty lies in “all that captures your aesthetic attention and presents itself as the best option for its existence.” She manipulates metal with her very own hands and mind: “I make a mental effort to always surround myself with whatever gives me energy and pleasure. Perhaps maintaining this attitude as I attempt to master the steel gives the shapes a certain sensuality…” 

Her female references range from Barbara Hepworth to Seraphine, Clara Peeters or Sofonisba Anguissola but her original idol is her mother, a self-taught artist and nature lover: “At the beginning of my career I was trapped, trying to imitate how nature, on any of its multiple scales, develops and expands in space. This led me to gradually observe nature more and more from the inside. Now I feel as though I am a part of nature so I let myself get carried away by its internal pulse. I think that one of the advantages of getting older, and therefor gaining experience, is that you become at peace with the sole idea of getting it wrong as you see yourself growing ever smaller in the vastness.”

Above Blanca is wearing Drap jacket and Drap pants.

Photographed by Claire O'keefe